top of page

Press Releases

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 5, 2024

“DR. KIMO” RECEIVES IRON WORKERS’ ENDORSEMENT

HILO, Hawaiʻi—In the first major endorsement of the 2024 mayoral race, the Hawaiʻi Iron Workers Union Local 625 threw their support behind Dr. C. Kimo Alameda in his run for Mayor of Hawaiʻi County. “Local 625, under the leadership of Mr. T. George Paris, is proud to endorse Dr. Kimo Alameda for mayor. We know he will always put the community first, and fight for the infrastructure investments that Hawaiʻi Island needs,” the union said in a statement. Local 625 represents almost a thousand members across the state, including many on Hawaiʻi Island, who provide essential construction, repair, and maintenance services for critical infrastructure projects. “Almost a hundred years ago, my grandfather was an ironworker in Hilo,” Alameda said when accepting the endorsement, “Back in those days, he and his crew would build and fix all the steam engines, railroad tracks, boilers, and other machinery used on the old sugar mills. Today, Local 625 continues to keep that legacy of hard work and dedication alive. I am very proud to be supported by the amazing members of Local 625.” The endorsement signals that the Big Island mayor’s race is now in full swing as other unions and organizations consider which candidates they might support. Alameda is hopeful that he will receive additional endorsements as well, saying “I’m excited to earn the support of everybody who wants to bring the spirit of aloha back to County government.” ### For media inquiries, please contact: C. Kimo Alameda, Ph.D. (808) 345-9280 - or - William “Bill” Brilhante, Jr. East Hawaiʻi Campaign Manager billbril@hotmail.com (808) 756-5584

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 19, 2024

ALAMEDA COMMENTS ON HOMELESS SWEEPS

Dr. Kimo Alameda provided the following statement in response to the recent homeless sweep in Hilo: I believe homeless “sweeps” are a poor solution to a long-standing problem. Today's relocation of individuals in downtown Hilo was misguided in several ways. First, nonprofit agencies like Going Home Hawaii, HOPE Services, and the Neighborhood Place of Puna who deliver the majority of homeless services in the county appear in disagreement with the county and it would be better for the county to have a unified inclusive approach. These service providers work with our houseless ‘ohana every day and are the experts, so elected officials should look to them for guidance. Second, the Downtown Improvement Association should be consulted because in the past, the county’s relocation efforts have pushed people who need assistance to the front of the stores, which hinders positive business traffic flow. Third, there will be a point-in-time count next week, which is a federally mandated census of people experiencing homelessness across our island. It is so important that we get an accurate count because that data is used to apply for resources from the federal government to address homelessness. Conducting a sweep right before makes it difficult to get an accurate count, which could reduce the amount of funding our island receives. I remember the Kona sweep a year ago when ACLU Legal Director Wookie Kim sent a letter to Mayor Mitch Roth, Parks and Recreation Director Maurice Messina, Police Chief Ben Moszkowicz, and Corporation Counsel Elizabeth Strance stating in part that “when houseless people in the County have no safe place to go without being subjected to the County’s laws that punish sheltering in public spaces…violate the mandates of the U.S. and Hawaii constitutions.” The letter continued to demand the county stop the homeless sweeps, yet the county continues to force the visibly homeless individuals to neighboring communities. We understand that there are individuals out in our community that are experiencing homelessness and we will work on a multipronged approach to address their needs. Some individuals will not want to be “housed” but have other areas they feel safe relocating. Some have greater needs such as medication, mental health, and addiction. The county has to work on these options in collaboration with those experiencing homelessness, service providers, and law enforcement. If elected, we would work closely with the community, nonprofits, and churches to expand programs that work and eliminate practices that break trust between our houseless ‘ohana and service providers. Many of our houseless individuals have simply been priced out of housing in Hawaii, and I would work to expand programs like HOPE services Sacred Heart Affordable Housing Program, which provides permanent affordable housing and alternative structures for kupuna. I think Twinkle Borge from the Pu‘uhonua O Wai‘anae group on Oahu sets another example we can emulate. She is the leader, mentor, and sergeant-in-arms in the village. We can replicate that model if the county can work better with the community, law enforcement, churches, and non-profits. Most importantly, I would listen to the people who have experienced homelessness, housing insecurity, and those who are living it right now. They are the experts in their own lives. They have lived through these unnecessary “sweeps,” know how far it can set a person back from getting off the streets, and they know we can make a better way. Together, we can Save Hawai‘i And Keep Aloha. ### About Dr. Kimo Alameda https://www.kimoformayor.com Dr. Kimo graduated from St. Joseph High School and earned his doctorate in psychological, educational, and cultural studies from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Born in Hilo, Dr. Kimo grew up on a ranch in the hills of Waiākea Uka. He worked alongside his siblings, making ends meet with his parent’s plumbing business, and helped on the family ranch. This work ethic translated easily to other areas as Dr. Kimo gained many athletic and academic accolades and quickly became a state and county government leader: •Executive, Hawai‘i County Office of Aging •Director, Office of Health Equity, Department of Health •Executive, Office of Multicultural Services, Department of Health, Adult Mental Health Division •State Transition & Behavioral Specialist, Department of Health-Child & Adolescent Mental Health Division •State Technical Assistance Consultant / Supervisor, Department of Education-Pacific Resources for Education and Learning After his time in government, then came the opportunity to fulfill the role of CEO of the Bay Clinic Health Center, a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC), where Dr. Kimo ultimately fulfilled his vision of creating an entity that would serve and improve health care island wide - the Hawai‘i Island Community Health Center (HICHC) - created by merging the east-side Bay Clinic with West Hawai‘i Community Health Center. Dr. Kimo then served as the HICHC Vice President of Business Development before stepping down to pursue a run for the Mayor's Office. For media inquiries, please contact: C. Kimo Alameda, Ph.D. 808-345-9280 connect@kimoformayor.com - Or - William “Bill” Brilhante, Jr. East Hawaiʻi Campaign Manager billbril@hotmail.com 808-756-5584

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 14, 2024

ALAMEDA LAUNCHES BID FOR MAYOR

HILO, Hawaiʻi — After months of community meetings across the island, including previous rallies held in Waimea, Nāʻālehu, and Kona, Dr. C. Kimo Alameda officially launched his campaign for Mayor of Hawaiʻi County at a community rally last night at Wailoa State Park, where he emphasized his connection with the Big Island and its people.  “This place, and all of its wonderful and diverse people, helped shape me into the person I am today” Alameda said to over 300 supporters in the audience, “And like so many of you, I want to make sure that this island can continue to shape the lives of our children and grandchildren, so that they can sustain and perpetuate our local culture and identity. Our campaign is an expression of gratitude and aloha for our island, our culture, and our people.”  Educated as a counselor and psychologist, “Dr. Kimo” worked at the state Department of Health as a mental health specialist and later as the director of the Office of Health Equity. In 2015, he entered county government as the Executive of the Office of Aging under Mayors Billy Kenoi and Harry Kim before becoming CEO of the non-profit Bay Clinic Health Center. He most recently served as vice president of business development for the newly-formed Hawaiʻi Island Community Health Center, one of the largest federally-qualified health centers in the state. “I have always been dedicated to building strong, healthy, and resilient communities,” Alameda said of his career, “And this campaign is an extension of that dedication. Ultimately, I want to bring my passion and commitment to our county government and serve the people of Hawaiʻi Island. As I have said before, we have an opportunity to bring the spirit of aloha back to our local government.” In his announcement, Alameda outlined his priorities of “Live, Work, and Play,” and specifically highlighted the lack of attainable housing as a key issue of his campaign. “My goal is to build a Hawaiʻi where people can get educated, find good jobs, raise their families, and enjoy this beautiful ʻāina that we’ve been blessed with,” he said. “Why is the county getting in the way of us building an additional dwelling on property we already own?... Our kids don’t want to move far away… if they could, they would move out of their parents’ house and live right in the back. I know because I have seven of um and three of um said they would.” In a statement before the rally, Alameda expressed his excitement for the coming race, saying “This election goes beyond ideas. I will continue to share my vision with communities all over our county, and I look forward to engaging with everyone who cares about this island and wants to see County government start working for all of us again.” Kimo and his wife, Star, currently reside in Hilo with their seven children and one grandchild. More information on Dr. Kimo and his candidacy can be found at www.kimoformayor.com.  Video News Release and Still Photo Assets available here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1zgYMFxLny-WPent9ZiRS8ssrjZmMtPTJ?usp=sharing ### About Dr. Kimo Alameda https://www.kimoformayor.com  Dr. Kimo graduated from St. Joseph High School and earned his doctorate in psychological, educational, and cultural studies from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.  Born in Hilo, Dr. Kimo grew up on a ranch in the hills of Waiākea Uka. He worked alongside his siblings, making ends meet with his parent’s plumbing business, and helped on the family ranch. This work ethic translated easily to other areas as Dr. Kimo gained many athletic and academic accolades and quickly became a state and county government leader: Executive, Hawai‘i County Office of Aging Director, Office of Health Equity, Department of Health Executive, Office of Multicultural Services, Department of Health, Adult Mental Health Division State Transition & Behavioral Specialist, Department of Health-Child & Adolescent Mental Health Division State Technical Assistance Consultant / Supervisor, Department of Education-Pacific Resources for Education and Learning After his time in government, then came the opportunity to fulfill the role of CEO of the Bay Clinic Health Center, a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC), where Dr. Kimo ultimately fulfilled his vision of creating an entity that would serve and improve health care island wide - the Hawai‘i Island Community Health Center (HICHC) - created by merging the east-side Bay Clinic with West Hawai‘i Community Health Center. Dr. Kimo then served as the HICHC Vice President of Business Development before stepping down to pursue a run for the Mayor's Office. For media inquiries, please contact: C. Kimo Alameda, Ph.D. 808-345-9280 connect@kimoformayor.com - Or - William “Bill” Brilhante, Jr. East Hawaiʻi Campaign Manager billbril@hotmail.com 808-756-5584

bottom of page